Tuesday, February 22, 2011

Brain Plasticity and Transcendental Meditation with Dr. Fred Travis

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Dr Fred Travis explains what happens to the brain when someone practices the Transcendental Meditation technique.


All experiences changes the brain and nothing changes the brain like transcending.

Fred Travis: Mr Lynch and Dr Hagelin gave a very compelling image of a Unified Field at the basis of our thought, at the basis of our behavior and these compelling images have concrete reality in the functioning of our brain. The quality of the functioning of your brain determines the quality of the functioning of your mind.

If you want a creative mind you need a creative brain. If you want a calm and alert mind you need a restful and alert brain. This relationship goes the other way as well - the brain not only generates experience but also each experience we have changes the brain.

Every time you see something, you hear something the words now going into your ears are creating this cascade of electrical activity in your brain. Individual neuron by individual neuron is sending the information and you have as if these connecting hands, we have this delicate network over your brain and that's what lets you see. That's what lets you decide and every time you have an experience that network gets a little stronger.

Your brain is a RIVER it's not a ROCK. Indeed 70% of your brain cells change every day. What we have here is an example of 2 dendrites. Dendrites are where one cell takes in information and these little bumps that you see are called dendritic spines, this is where one neuron is communicating with this neuron. You have 100 billion neurons in your brain, each one get input from about 10,000 other neurons every second. You could imagine getting 10,000 phone calls every second and trying to integrate it together into one coherent output.

One of the most research ways to improve holistic brain function is through practicing the Transcendental Meditation technique.

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